I don’t need no stinking badges

But I have one. And there are more over at my Credly page where I finally accepted the badges. I’ve been teaching online for years, but now I officially have badges for it.

design-clinic

Epidemic

Covid-19 shut down my college on March 10th. Since then, I’ve been working from home. I was already teaching a couple of online courses, but now my formerly on-campus courses are meeting over Zoom. It’s been a scramble trying to sort out the technical details, trying to assist students with access issues, and, to be honest, managing my own anxiety. For now, I am healthy and hope to remain so. The semester runs until mid-May so I need to find my work-from-home pattern and stick to it. I’m not going back to campus until September at the earliest.

Map of corona virus infection rates in NYC

Here is a map (from the NY Daily News) that purports to depict infection levels around the city. I live in Bay Ridge, the yellow slice at the southern edge of Brooklyn, where infections are fewer (so far). My neighborhood seems quieter than usual, except for ambulance sirens and drag racers taking advantage of the light traffic to speed around the local streets. Local restaurants are closed but still delivering takeout. Local grocery stores are open, and I’ve been able to buy everything I need except for disinfectant cleaning wipes. I am home more than usual, but the silver lining here is that my cranky rescue cat is happy to have my increased attention.

I am working through a grading backlog for work, but soon I will catch up and can turn to other diversions. I’ve finished Star Trek Picard now; what other shows or movies should I watch? My To Be Read pile is literally filling multiple bookshelves, so I won’t ask for more book titles, but I do need to work on my playlists; so what music should I hear? What vegan recipes should I cook? What embroidery patterns should I try? I welcome suggestions in the comments.

And of course, there’s my genealogy to work on…

I hope all my readers are safe and well.

 

 

Google map for Hegartys and Murphys in Cambridge

Relatives still living and/or working in Cambridge expressed curiosity about exactly where our ancestors lived in the early 20th century, so I made a Google map. These home addresses were taken from censuses, birth records, draft registrations, news articles, etc. Both the Hegartys and Murphys immigrated from Ireland to Cambridge, Massachusetts. The Murphys moved over to Somerville and, in their later years, the Hegartys moved to Brighton. Click through and be ready to zoom in or out as necessary.

 

Chauncey, a new cat

I ended up restarting my academic blog on WordPress.com, so no more academic complaints in this one. This will be the personal blog with cats!

Part of the reason for my lack of posts has been a recent state of cat crisis. I lost two beloved cats in the past two years. Both were senior cats with cancer who had lived with me for over a decade. I was heartbroken, but looked forward to enjoying life with no litter box and no vet bills.

But as the months went by, I found missed not just my cats but cat presence! So in late February, I adopted Chauncey from Street Cat Alumni Rescue. She is about 7. She had lived on the streets for years until someone or something cut her tail off and she needed tending. You can read her rescue story at Meow AF.  She is healed up now (at least physically) and is smart and funny, although also bitey and scratchy when displeased. She is afraid of the sound the USS Enterprise-D makes in Star Trek: TNG when it swoops through space with a galactic SWISHHHH that I guess sounds like a hiss. She has just sauntered out to demand dinner, so I will leave you with a cat picture since it’s Caturday.

 

WW1 casualties in my family tree

United States soldier 

Infantryman Thomas Philip Murphy, my great-uncle, was wounded eleven times during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive in France, and died in the evacuation hospital there in October 1918. He was 23. He was eventually buried in Arlington, Mass. in 1921. My father used to tell a poignant story of Thomas’ mother going to meet her son’s casket at the train station and welcoming him home.

commonwealth_gq67jx20b_access800
My great-uncle’s portrait from the Cambridge World War I Memorial Plaques.

 

British soldier (from Newfoundland)

My first cousin twice removed Bernard Cleary enlisted in the Newfoundland Regiment and died along with almost the entire regiment at Beaumont-Hamel on 1 July 1916. If you get a chance to see the exhibit “Beaumont-Hamel and the Trail of the Caribou” at The Rooms in St. John, definitely go.

Ignatius Furey & Bernard Cleary
My cousin Bernard Cleary (right) died at Beaumont-Hamel. Ignatius Furey (left) died at Gallipoli. I am related to a Newfoundland Furey family, but I’m not sure if I’m related to Ignatius, but I am loathe to crop him out of the photo. So there he is.

 

British sailor (from Ireland)

My great-great-uncle Timothy Deasy lied about his age to join the British Royal Navy in 1897 when he was 15 years old. He served in the Royal Navy until he died with about 900 other people aboard the HMS Defence, an armored cruiser sunk during the Battle of Jutland in 1916. The wreck of the Defence has since been found by divers in the North Sea; it is currently protected as a war grave under the British Protection of Military Remains Act.

HMS_Defence_1907
HMS Defence in 1907 (photo from Wikipedia). I don’t have a photo of Timothy Deasy but here is the ship he died on, and apparently still rests with at the bottom of the ocean.

Sources

Cambridge World War I Memorial Plaques, Cambridge Public Library. Digital images. Digital Commonwealth: Massachusetts Collections Online.

Deasy, James. Family history and ledger. 1895. Privately held.

Death notice for Thomas P. Murphy, Cambridge Chronicle, 16 July 1921, p. 3. Digital image. Cambridge Public Library, Historic Cambridge Newspaper Collection (http://cambridge.diconsulting.com : accessed June 2015).

England. Admiralty: Royal Navy Registers of Seamen’s Services. Access via “Discovery.” Database with images. The National Archives.

Glavine, James. Our People . . . Our Church: Sts. Peter and Paul Parish, Harbour Main, Newfoundland, 1857-1982. Harbour Main, Newfoundland, 1983. 112.

HMS Defence (1907).” Wikipedia.

United States. World War I Military Cablegrams, Main Series, War Department to AEF HQ, #2683. National Archives. Database. Footnote.com. (Which has since become fold3.com)

Goodbye Bridey

Family History Query about the LaCour family

2 thoughts on “Family History Research”

  1. Dear Emily, thank you for your research 🙂 I am helping a neighbor (your distant cousin, I suppose!) with her family tree. Her father was from Newfoundland and she has Edward de la court (Lacour) #102 and Mary Hicks in her tree. I was wondering where you found the reference to his parents? Many thanks!

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  2. Hi Mia,
    I don’t have a reference to Edward LaCour’s parents. He and his wife Mary Hicks are recorded twice in my ahnentafel because two of his daughters ended up in my tree — it’s a small fishing town with a lot of interconnections. Edward LaCour’s 1790 wedding to Mary Hicks was recorded at St. Paul’s Anglican Church in Harbour Grace. Harbour Main didn’t have a church at that time. I also relied on entries for Edward LaCour’s land claims in the Harbour Main section of the Plantation Book from the late 1790s to the early 1800s.

    I don’t know who Edward LaCour’s parents were. There is a section on the De La Cour family of Jersey on the ThisIsland wiki, but I can’t link Edward directly to it. http://www.theislandwiki.org/index.php/De_La_Cour

    I’m glad you asked this question because I haven’t looked at this branch of my tree in quite awhile. I’m horrified to see that some incidents are relying on OneWorldTree for a source, or just various Ancestry family trees. I need to firm up these sources. I am seeing connections to Furey and LaCour families in my AncestryDNA results, so it’s probably correct, but I need better sources.

    Good luck with your research!
    – Emily

I am thankful to Mia for the question, but I am now going to turn off comments on the Family History Page. I know from previous websites that a comments section gets rapidly out of control. PLEASE DO FEEL FREE TO CONTACT ME WITH QUESTIONS THOUGH! See the Contact Page. It is also OK to comment on blog posts because they move down the page. What I don’t want is a Family History Page with a long string of comments, half of which are side conversations.

Ultimately I hope to add more Family History pages with sketches of each family.

Farewell, Fredrika

late Friday link post